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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
's offer to avoid the fiscal cliff was laughed at by republicans. this week, the gop countererred. extend the bush tax cuts to everyone, including the rich. revenue, cost savings, cutting, whatever you want to call it from vague areas such as closing, special interest loopholes and deductions, savings from health care and cuts in discretionary spending. other than that, no specifics. president obama wasn't feeling it. he said the gop must agree to one thing to get anywhere close do a deal. >>. >> wee going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> speaker boehner fired back. >> this week, we made a good faith offer to avert the fiscal crisis. now, we need a response from the white house. we can't sit here and negotiate with ourselves. >> so, here we are, just over three weeks from going over the fiscal cliff. you're probably getting a lot of stuff around the house this weekend wondering what the heck is going on in these houses in washington. this is the worst of american politics. they put themselves and their political games
achieved nothing this week. this is "your money." president obama's offer to avoid the fiscal cliff was laughed at by republicans last week. this week the gop counter offered. theirs, extend tax cuts to the everyone including the rich. $2.2 million in areas from closing loopholes and deductions, savings on health care and cuts in discretionary spending. other than that, no specifics. president obama said the gop must agree to one thing to get anywhere close to a deal. >> we have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. we're not going to get a deal without it. >> speaker boehner fired back. >> this week we made a good faith offer to avert the fiscal crisis. now we need a response from the white house. we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> here we are just weeks away from going over the fiscal cliff. you probably wonder what's going on in these houses in washington. they put themselves and their political gains first and put their future in prosperity second. hey, you voted them in. remember what happened the last time washington got into a budget battle like this? lawmakers put a band
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has b
a moment. we do want to begin with the markets and that looming fiscal cliff. the dow finishing november lower for the second consecutive month. the blue chips falling half a percent in november. and #% sinnasdaq and s&p did fi higher last month. six out of ten sectors managed to post a gain. consumer discretionary stocks up the most. utilities the biggest losers. and while individual trading sessions may have been choppy, it was another month of low volatility. the vix remained below 20 for the fourth consecutive month and that's the longest streak since february of 2007. a big part of the market story has obviously been a big topic dominating the sunday talk shows. tim geithner arguing republicans need make the next move in negotiations. >> republicans have said that they don't like those reforms or they would like to do more. and if that's true, then they should tell us what they would like as an alternative. build on those, tell us how. but we can't react to anything until we see the details of the proposal and we need it on the rates and revenue side as well as on the spending side.
this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the
with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as a threat, using the debt ceiling as a way to achieve a different agenda is dangerous. it's playing with fire. and yet, with the opportunity to take that off the table, reassure the markets, the minority leader blinked. i don't know why. it's hard to figure out the strategy that he's employing, but we would hope on this side of the aisle -- and i think i speak for all of us -- that he would reconsider and perhaps early next week let us vote on his own resolution. i yield the floor. mr. schumer: i notice th
the fiscal cliff. now, the republican plan purports to cut $1.3 trillion and raise $800 billion in new revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific number one. $600 billion. cut medicaid, pays for nursing homes for seniors, of course. priority number two. three, cut the adequate cola for seniors on social security. even though 40% of seniors depend principally or totally upon social security and the cola already underestimated inflation particularly for medicare, essentials they need. cut that. not a driver of the deficit but, hey, cut that. one more specific. preserve the bush-era tax rates for income over $250,000. it's not a tax increase for everybody who earns over $250,000. it's only the income over $250,000 that would get additional taxes if the bush-era rates went away and the president's proposal was passed. but, no, they want to preserve -- totally preserve tax cuts for income over $250,000. they want to preserve the reduced capital gains rate and dividends rate which principally who ben pets, who else, millionaires and billionaires. now -- benefits, wh
of congress plus it puts the fiscal cliff and place right now and you lay it out i'm sorry, count me out. stacte want to take the first question? >> you raise a good point. this is where people's eyes glaze over. they can say whatever you want them to say. but the notion, i do think that there's been to the relationship between revenues and the titles and if we want to go bigger the better we need to push all of those, the smaller unit and the less you do on the other side, but there are some who say the idea of the american public is going to buy into this notion okay we are going to look devotees taxes go up so everything can be returned in a tax cut, and we go through this magical power. they are going to think 90% of the approval. so, you're going to have a general consensus. you do this year to get 500 of that in the interest savings alone. this should not be as challenging as it is. >> the other thing i would disagree about is the fact and i have been a huge jet kit and continue to be a huge advocate of tax reform debate and it's a critically important piece and i do think the noti
, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal slope, not a fiscal cliff. it is not like a zombie accomplice happens. if market confidence was up the window, that could be damaging. >> i think is likely there is going to be a deal, some other deadline for another deal next year. it is really important and they not said a whole series of opportunities to have that kind of collapse again. they have a couple months, but they have to make sure whenever they come up with for the last significant period of time. i think that will build confidence. i want to come back to the question of housing. i think is so important to overstate the importance of housing to the economy. especially from the starter business and start up perspective. those are the companies with a lot of job creation. they all grow very rapidly, sometimes growing into large companies. they are not starting up that high written all right now. a big chunk of that is confidence. folks often do not have financial resources. if there are looking at the value of their home and 401k, they are taking a risk. there are calculati
broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, halting employment growth, driving unemployment up instead of down, triggering a deep cuts to programs that families across the country count on. the job before the united states congress is to reach an agreement that builds on the economic progress that we are making, and puts us on a path to fiscal stability. we need to cut more spending, and generate more revenue. we need to do it in a smart way that keeps our economy growing. earlier this year, congress extended the payroll tax cut through 2012. the two percentage point payroll tax cut has p
:00 eastern. john boehner makes remarks on the fiscal cliff. we will show you that when the happens. by now, a little bit more about the fiscal cliff. >> we turn our attention this morning about unemployment benefits and how insurance could back -- how insurance could be impacted. thank you for coming in. we want to start the discussion. when we're talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are we talking about here? >> unemployment insurance is the combination of federal and state programs. it usually lasts up to six weeks. it can be extended up to 93 weeks, depending on which they were in. it is this extension that we're really talking about as part of the fiscal cliff. >> that is what might be cut. that is what automatically expires. we know it cost $30 billion to continue additional unemployment benefits. of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. firm stand. we have seen in the past obama host: what specific benefits do guest: usually some kind of a cash benefit or they may help the search for a job. it is usually about $300 a week. it can vary from sta
on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. >> [applause] >> can she borrow your stool? >> this is my wife kim and here is the song we sing to our twin boys actually about two years ago we went in to sing them to sleep with this lull by and we got the guitar out and sat down on the side of the bed and we were about to play the opening cords and rough fuss looked up at me and said you know dad, we don't have to do this anymore. ♪ ♪ >> good buy and thank you very much. >> among the iletms on the agenda next week appointing members to a committee to hash out an agreement it was defense bill next year. the house planned to adjourn for the holidays next week but the house will be back in session december 17 to deal with the s
the country goes over the fiscal cliff goes by, more and more republicans have joined our chorus. they recognize that the willing misto compromise sooner has put them in a real bind. so reasonable republicans are asking the house leadership to allow a vote on the senate-passed legislation. what was once a trickle has become more of a flood. last week republican representative tom cole said it was time to give middle-class families certainty their taxes won't go up by $2,200 on average on january 1. then tim scott from north carolina ad admitted that the senate-passed tax cut will surely pass the house since it will take only 26 republican ren votes for passage. i don't most of the time agree with david brooks but no one can dispute this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on
of negotiations over what is called the fiscal cliff. also, don't forget to explore the history and literary culture of new york capital city of albany this weekend. book tv is on c-span2 and american history to be on c-span three. >> coming up at 7:00 c-span will be lot of discussion unskilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is sponsoring a bill to allow more highly skilled veterans and to the u.s. >> we have had these this the five explosions of knowledge in madison, but we have not coordinated care. all the services that we have end up having some any cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. we have to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? and income on a global level where we doing some times? and, of course, now we have to these reports saying 30 percent of everything we do may not be necessary in after. we will be step back, 30 percent of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures. this is something, i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the
sandy, and we have all of this debate going on over the fiscal cliff, that's driving us all crazy, right? >> yes, it is. >> and what it's also doing is that it has gotten the corporate seblgtor in a position where they're not vin investing. they're waiting to see what's happening. nonetheless, we're still creating jobs. if you take into consideration the fact that we have those things, those neglect factors in at the same time regenerating jobs, and that means that there's a significant potential for the economy to grow. >> is it possible that this whole debate and the fiscal cliff, whether or not we go over it or not, would bakt how many people are working the next year? >> it will definitely impact, but i think what the numbers are telling us and what we've seen for the last couple of months is that the affect will not be as great as most people are predicting. you know, we kind of got this y2k kifr syndrome that's going on. it will certainly have an affect, but it also means that we can -- we're in a position to really craft a real comprehensive way to -- >> are these good jobs? what
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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